The Gestalt Agent's Handbook

Gestalt_Reification.jpg

In 1972, Kurt’s later-to-be friend and Diamond Sufi Ranch resident, Walter (Clifford) Barney wrote a thesis about Gestalt Therapy while pursuing a Master’s Degree in Counseling. His collaboration with two friends became as much of the subject of his thesis as Gestalt Therapy itself—his documentation of their interaction a practical demonstration of the Gestalt process. Combining concepts with process documentation, this paper anticipated elements of what is conventionally referred to today as “mindfulness” training, bring attention to body-mind awareness.
Barney writes, “Most people read books in order to learn something from them. By writing a book, we collude with this expectation of the reader. We deal with this trap in two ways: by letting the reader watch our process as we write the book, and so become aware of our dilemma; and by playing verbal tricks on him, so that when he begins to think that he learns from us, rather than from himself, he suddenly finds himself in a blind alley, logically.”

November 24, 1963

Kurt clipped articles from newspapers and magazines like crazy, but rarely kept an entire page let alone a section of the local paper. The exception is this, the front section of the San Francisco Examiner from 1963. Of note is the slogan in the paper's masthead: "America First."

Oswald.jpg

Russell's Other Dream

russell.jpg

Kurt respected Bertrand Russell (pictured), the British polymath who --philosopher, author, social activist, devoted pacifist--also had a passion for mathematics.

This typewritten sheet was found within what Kurt liked to call his half-vast archives.

Russell_dream.jpg

Only Two Can Play This Game

Only_two.jpg

In addition to being a visionary mathematician, G. Spencer Brown was a poet, and his small book Only Two Can Play This Game was as important to Kurt von Meier as Brown's book Laws of Form. Kurt regularly distributed this excerpt from the "notes" section of Brown's poetry book to his students, which Brown had published under his pseudonym James Keys. The excerpt neatly encapsulates a number of topics of particular interest to Kurt, including The Void, Eternity, Unity, and Brown's mathematical model, the key unlocking the mystery of being.